Craft Beer
Beverages

Ale is a type of beer brewed using a warm fermentation method, resulting in a sweet, full-bodied and fruity taste.

Ale´s can be seperated into different beer styles:

  • Mild Ale 
  • Pale Ale 
  • Brown Ale
  • Heather Ale
  • Strong Ale

In the nineteenth century, the Bow Brewery in England exported beer to India, including a pale ale that benefited from the duration of the voyage and was highly regarded among consumers in India. To avoid spoilage, Bow and other brewers added extra hops as a natural preservative. This beer was the first of a style of export ale that became known as India Pale Ale or IPA.

Stout is a dark beer that includes roasted malt or roasted barley, hops, water and yeast. Stouts were traditionally the generic term for the strongest or stoutest porters, typically 7% or 8% alcohol by volume.

The first known use of the word Stout for beer was in a document dated 1677, the sense being that a stout beer was a strong beer not a dark beer. The name Porter was first used in 1721 to describe a dark brown beer that had been made with roasted malts. Because of the huge popularity of porters, brewers made them in a variety of strengths. The stronger beers were called “stout porters”, so the history and development of stout and porter are intertwined, and the term stout has become firmly associated with dark beer, rather than just strong beer.

For such a geographically small country, Belgium sports quite an impressive number of beer styles. Belgian beers are primarily ales (as opposed to lagers) with a heavy emphasis on malts and a lot of fruity yeast flavors.

Two common varieties of Wheat beer are Weißbier (German – “white beer”) based on the German tradition of mixing at least 50% wheat to barley malt to make a light coloured top-fermenting beer, and Witbier (Dutch – “white beer”) based on the Belgian tradition of using flavorings such as coriander and orange peel. Belgian white beers are often made with raw unmalted wheat, as opposed to the malted wheat used in other varieties.

Both German Weißbier and Belgian witbier are termed “white beers” because “wheat” has the same etymological root as “white” in most West Germanic languages.

Fruit- and Spiced Beer are brewed with fresh fruits or spices. For example cherries or honey. Beer that has fruit syrup or fruit lemonade added after (the finale stage of) fermentation, in other words as a flavouring, are termed “Radlers” (“Shandy” in the UK) definitely not fruit beer.

Until the 19th century, the German word Lagerbier referred to all types of bottom-fermented, cool-conditioned beer, in normal strengths. In Germany today, however, the term is mainly reserved for the prevalent lager beer styles of southern Germany, “Helles” (pale), or a “Dunkel” (dark). Pilsner, a more heavily hopped pale lager, is most often known as “Pilsner”, “Pilsener”, or “Pils“.